Go for the gold

April 11, 2014

A multimillionaire nearing the end of his life was distraught because he had worked so hard for his wealth and he wanted to be able to take it with him when he died. He prayed and asked God if he could do so.

“Sorry,” God said. “Rules are rules.”

But the man begged and pleaded, and eventually God relented.

“All right, you win,” God said. “I’ll make an exception just this once. You can bring one suitcase.”

Overjoyed, the man took his largest suitcase, filled it with bars of pure gold, and set it beside his bed.

Not long afterward, the man died and arrived at the gates of heaven. St. Peter took one look at the suitcase and said, “You can’t bring that in here.”

The man explained that he had special permission from God. St. Peter was skeptical, but went to check the story out. After a while he returned.

“You’re right,” Peter said. “God says you’re allowed one suitcase. But I’ll have to check its contents before letting it through.”

St. Peter opened the suitcase to inspect the worldly goods that the man had found too precious to leave behind, and said in astonishment, “You brought pavement?”


Are two heads better than one?

April 10, 2014

Peekaboo.


Spring fever

April 8, 2014

spring


About time those scofflaws got what they deserved

April 6, 2014

 


Happy birthday to a great American

April 5, 2014

Booker T. Washington was born on this day in 1856, the illegitimate son of a black slave and a white plantation owner. Following emancipation, he worked his way through school, eventually becoming a teacher. In 1881, at the age of 25, he helped to found the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, a college for training black teachers.

Washington devoted his life to improving the lives of black Americans through education and vocational training, with a strong emphasis on teaching the life skills they would need to gain social acceptance, overcome white racism, and lead productive lives. He was often criticized by other black civil rights leaders of his time who found his style too understated and insufficiently confrontational. Washington’s formula for success for black Americans — education, thrift, and hard work — is what many black kids nowadays dismiss as “acting white.”

Booker T. Washington said:

“There’s a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. … Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances because they do not want to lose their jobs. There is a certain class of race-problem solvers who don’t want the patient to get well because as long as the disease holds out, they have not only an easy means of making a living, but also an easy medium through which to make themselves prominent before the public.”

And:

“Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome.”

And:

“No greater injury can be done to any youth than to let him feel that because he belongs to this or that race he will be advanced in life regardless of his own merits or efforts.”

Washington wrote fourteen books, including an autobiography, Up From Slavery, which was published in 1901. He was instrumental in raising the funds for and helping to establish thousands of educational institutions for blacks throughout the south. He remained head of the Tuskegee Institute until his death in 1915, at which time Tuskegee’s endowment had grown to more than $1.5 million, due largely to his efforts.


Happy April 1st

April 1, 2014

april fools


Evolution: that was then, this is now

March 31, 2014

evolution


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