Advertisements from long, long ago — coffin nail edition

28 Responses to Advertisements from long, long ago — coffin nail edition

  1. Tricia says:

    Wow how times have changed! Have a smoke with your bikeride, what could be more healthy?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Many years ago, I used to go to exercise classes at a health and fitness center. I remember a guy who went there who, as soon as he got outside the building, would light up a cigarette, hop on his bike, and pedal away. It seemed incongruous to me. The only reasons I can think of for using a bicycle for transportation are a) you can’t afford a car, b) you’re doing it for your health, or c) you care about the environment — any one of which would seem to preclude smoking. Must be some other reason I’m not aware of.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Tricia says:

        Too funny! I must admit during my smoking days in college I would light up after working out. I wouldn’t dream of doing it while riding a bike though….

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dink Newcomb says:

        Lots of nostalgia here from much more innocent days when all advertising resembled a Hillary Clinton campaign speech.
        I was born in 1947 and from earliest times I remember people (my Father was a 4 pack a day Camel man, later Winston to filter out some tobacco farts) complaining about coughing and hacking up gross stuff because of smoking yet the companies actually advertised some cigarette brands as being healthy or “not a cough in a carload” (Old Gold brand).
        The John Wayne ad was pretty poignant and being viewed today, very much off the original message. He fought and beat lung cancer and died of subsequent stomach cancer, both of which were generally attributed to his 6 pack a day habit. Even a six pack of beer/day is pushing the limit but that’s 7.5 cigarette/hour/16 hour day– that’s lighting up on an average of a cigarette every 8 waking minutes in a day. I remember being like that for stressful periods of varying length. Lighting one cigarette from the butt of another but generally my 1 1/2 pack per day addiction was paltry compared to his. I guess I was not “A REAL MAN”. Quitting smoking was one of the most satisfying things I have ever done. The healthiest and best contribution to a longer life was, in retrospect, dumping the trouble making girlfriend who later spent a number of years as a guest of the state of S Carolina for stabbing her contemporary boyfriend to death during an argument. I was not such a stumbling, slow moving target as I presume he was but I would just as soon sleep soundly and go through life “unbobbited” thank you.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. 49lilykatz says:

    The “Dr. Batty’s for asthma treatment” advert is just amazing. He was well named! Thanks for the laugh, as always.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Some of these are unbelievable! ! Love the Salem springtime one…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Yvonne says:

    I remember smoking some oval shaped cigarettes and thinking I was hot stuff. That was a long time ago, and I’m so glad I quit soon after.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Dawn Marie says:

    Looking through these was a ‘blast from the past’ regarding several. I was never a smoker but pretty much everyone else in my family was. The Camel & Winston adds stood out the most for me & made me immediately remember my father who smoked both these brands. A pack Usually rolled up in the sleeve of his white or black tshirt! Hugs!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s been more than 45 years since cigarette advertising was banned from television and radio, but I can still remember all the jingles from those old TV commercials. I guess that says something about the amount of time I wasted watching television as a child.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dawn Marie says:

        giggles. Either that or you have a memory like a steel-trap! Let’s go with the latter. Hugs!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Dink Newcomb says:

        45 years ago? Hey, we all wasted a lot of time on TV in those days but we survived, at least to some extent. Actually though, advertising is full of shrewd manipulative people and I honestly believe that WE remember those jingles and slogans more from their skill in feeding us clever things that resonate with our brainwaves than how frequently we were exposed to them.
        For a small awkward example– I was a good student but I had to repeat French 1 because my brain fought it so hard with a teacher who never reached me– that was the only class I ever took that I could not handle and in those days it was mandatory for college. Never wanted to eat snails anyway.
        Sci, history, math– like a cool drink when walking out of the desert and I still remember with clarity, the teachers who motivated me speaking the words of much of the important stuff when the facts are accessed today– sorta like a short, mental youtube video.
        Forget Freud and others with their ground level fumbling– advertising snatched the psych ball and ran with it. Brain washing? No, more like brain painting– in psychedelic colors– decades before the Summer of Love and with clever words, not drugs!
        Also, I graduated in 1965, went away to 1 year of school, changed over to the SE Asia campus of the School of Hard Knocks and walked away from TV to a different reality and more luminous indelible memories of REAL LIFE irregardless of wanting to remember or not. I did not have a TV again until the late ’80s when I got one to enable a VCR and watch the nightly news.

        Liked by 1 person

        • When my husband and I got married 39 years ago, my father gave us an old second-hand black-and-white television that nobody wanted. The dang thing kept blowing fuses, and since the fuses were soldered into it, it had to be hauled to the TV repair joint every time it needed a fuse replaced. When we moved out of our apartment and into our first house a couple of months before our first child was born, we took the television set with us, even though it wasn’t working at the time. We were both too busy to think about taking the TV to be repaired, and soon we realized we didn’t miss it at all. Eventually my husband hauled the beast out to the curb for the trash collector to pick up, and all of our kids were raised television-free. They are all adults now and they think it’s hilarious that I still remember all the TV commercial jingles from my childhood (not to mention the theme songs to all the sixties sitcoms, which I sometimes embarrass them by singing).

          Like

          • Dink Newcomb says:

            I liked your reply and have more esteem for you with the idea of “being too busy for TV”. There are too many gadgets and diversions today– I grew up on farms (still live on one) and if it was daylight and I had no chores, I was out in the sun and the wind. People talk about kids lives nowadays but what alternatives do they have– if I was forced to have a family AND live in a city, I would not let my kids roam the streets with the thugs!
            Today I am retired for about 8 years and due to health/physical concerns, mostly chairbound. All my life until recently, I read like a fat kid eating a happy meal and it would be THE perfect way to while away the long hours of inactivity but my eyes have decided to betray me too and reading from small text on paper is way too tough. A man to whom TVs were uncherished gadgets has become the somewhat uncertain owner of a 60″ TV and a 34″ monitor– expensive doodads to facilitate internet reading a few more years. I have also taken up video gaming on a more than occasional basis which is POSITIVE if one does not descend into addiction. I find that while even online reading fatigues me, games, while requiring vision, are so inconsequential that I can play them dreadfully and still enjoy them without failure anxiety OR serious eyestrain.
            There is really very little control we have over life, is there.
            “the best laid plans o’ mice an’ men gang aft agley”
            AND, YES, I remember all those ridiculous TV show themes songs too! A common flash in my brain 50 some years later is Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor singing the Green Acres theme even though I seldom ever watched the show. What sort of psycho-sexual degeneracy do you suppose is prompting that?
            OH, ONE MORE THING. I have always loved birds and here on the lower coast of SC, those beautiful bluebirds are quite common but my favorite is the mockingbird– attractive, pleasant song and cojones the size of grapefruit. It is always a wonder to watch them driving a cat 10x their size away from the vicinity of their nest and many times I have watched them in a virulent frenzy at a high climbing chicken snake (Yellow Rat Snake). I have even seen the snake drop from the tree at times, for whatever reason but due to the attack.

            Liked by 1 person

  6. sepultura13 says:

    Reblogged this on Random Ramblings; Myriad Musings and commented:
    I love this aptly-named post, courtesy of the Bluebird of Bitterness!
    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Great vintage ads…we are following you now @ https://triggerreset.net/

    Liked by 1 person

  8. […] Advertisements from long, long ago — coffin nail edition […]

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Citizen Tom says:

    I grew watching those old commercials. I also watched what smoking did to my Dad. So I never took up the habit.

    When the law suits started against the tobacco companies, in spite of the fact I detest cigarette smoking, I was against the idea. All it was was an excuse to tax the cigarette companies and pay off a bunch of lawyers.

    Liked by 1 person

%d bloggers like this: