Sunday musical offering

February 16, 2020

And can it be that I should gain
An interest in the Saviour’s blood?
Died he for me, who caused his pain,
For me, who him to death pursued?
Amazing love! How can it be
That thou, my God, shouldst die for me?

He left his Father’s throne above,
So free, so infinite his grace,
Emptied himself of all but love,
And bled for Adam’s helpless race.
‘Tis mercy all, immense and free,
For O my God, it found out me.

No condemnation now I dread;
Jesus, and all in him, is mine.
Alive in him, my living Head,
And clothed in righteousness divine,
Bold I approach the eternal throne,
And claim the crown through Christ, my own.
Amazing love! How can it be
That thou, my God, shouldst die for me?


Sunday musical offering

June 2, 2019

Hail the day that sees Him rise, Alleluia!
To His throne above the skies, Alleluia!
Christ, the Lamb for sinners given, Alleluia!
Enters now the highest heaven, Alleluia!

There for Him the triumph waits, Alleluia!
Lift your heads, eternal gates, Alleluia!
He has conquered death and sin, Alleluia!
Take the King of glory in, Alleluia!

See, He lifts His hands above, Alleluia!
See, He shows the prints of love, Alleluia!
Hark, His gracious lips bestow, Alleluia!
Blessings on His church below, Alleluia!

Lord, beyond our mortal sight, Alleluia!
Raise our hearts to reach Thy light, Alleluia!
There Thy face unclouded see, Alleluia!
Find our heaven of heavens in Thee, Alleluia!


Happy birthday, Charles

December 18, 2018

In honor of the birthday of English hymn writer Charles Wesley (1707-1788), here is one of his greatest hits in an arrangement by American composer Dan Forrest (b. 1978) of a melody by German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847), performed by the combined choirs and orchestra of Concordia College


Sunday musical offering

July 29, 2018

Hallelujah!
And let this feeble body fail,

And let it faint or die;
My soul shall quit this mournful vail
And soar to worlds on high.
And I’ll sing hallelujah, and you’ll sing hallelujah,
And we’ll all sing hallelujah when we arrive at home.

Oh, what are all my sufferings here
If Lord thou count me meet,
With that enraptured host appear
And worship at Thy feet.
And I’ll sing hallelujah, and you’ll sing hallelujah,
And we’ll all sing hallelujah when we arrive at home. 

Give joy or grief, give ease or pain,
Take life or friends away;
But let me find them all again
In that eternal day.
And I’ll sing hallelujah, and you’ll sing hallelujah,
And we’ll all sing hallelujah when we arrive at home. 


Musical offering for Easter Sunday

April 1, 2018


Some beautiful music for Sunday

March 12, 2017


Some beautiful music for the fourth Sunday of Advent

December 18, 2016

It’s the birthday of the English hymn writer Charles Wesley (1707-1788), many of whose hymns — this one, for instance — are among the most familiar and best-loved in Christendom.

 


Some beautiful music for Sunday

October 16, 2016

Hallelujah!
And let this feeble body fail,
And let it faint or die;
My soul shall quit this mournful vail
And soar to worlds on high.
And I’ll sing hallelujah, and you’ll sing hallelujah,
And we’ll all sing hallelujah when we arrive at home. 

Oh, what are all my sufferings here
If Lord thou count me meet,
With that enraptured host appear
And worship at Thy feet.

And I’ll sing hallelujah, and you’ll sing hallelujah,
And we’ll all sing hallelujah when we arrive at home. 

Give joy or grief, give ease or pain,
Take life or friends away;
But let me find them all again
In that eternal day.
And I’ll sing hallelujah, and you’ll sing hallelujah,
And we’ll all sing hallelujah when we arrive at home. 


Some beautiful music for Sunday

February 14, 2016


Happy birthday, Charles

December 18, 2014

Charles Wesley was born in Epworth, Lincolnshire on December 18, 1707. His mother, Susannah, gave all of her many children — girls as well as boys — a rigorous classical education, which included learning Latin and Greek. Charles later attended Christ Church, Oxford. After graduating with a degree in classical languages and literature, Charles was ordained in the Church of England, and in 1735, Charles and his brother John sailed to the North American colony of Georgia as missionaries. But the venture was a disaster, and the brothers soon returned to England, defeated and discouraged.

What ended up being the lasting legacy of this miserable voyage resulted from the presence on the ship of a group of Moravian Christians, who often sang hymns together. This was something Charles was not used to hearing; the Anglican churches of that time had choirs that provided music for services, but there was no congregational singing. The Moravians inspired Charles to begin writing hymns that could be sung by anyone, not just trained vocalists. By the time of his death in 1788, Charles had written more than six thousand hymns. Open just about any hymnal in just about any church, and the odds are you’ll find at least a dozen hymns by Charles Wesley. This is one of my favorites.


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