Happy anniversary, Statue of Liberty

October 28, 2015

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. —Benjamin Franklin

Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word: equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude. —Alexis de Tocqueville

I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. ―Thomas Jefferson

A country cannot subsist well without liberty, nor liberty without virtue. ―Daniel Webster

He that would make his own liberty secure, must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty, he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself. —Thomas Paine

The love of liberty is the love of others; the love of power is the love of ourselves. ―William Hazlitt

Man is not free unless government is limited. There’s a clear cause and effect here that is as neat and predictable as a law of physics: As government expands, liberty contracts. ―Ronald Reagan

There’s a reason why we have the Statue of Liberty, not the Statue of Equality. —Charles Krauthammer


Happy anniversary, Statue of Liberty

October 28, 2014

“Liberty Enlightening the World” was unveiled to the public one hundred and twenty-eight years ago today. The statue was designed by the French artist and sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, with engineering help from Eugene Viollet-le-Duc and Alexandre Gustave Eiffel. It was constructed in France, then dismantled and packed into more than two hundred shipping crates, then shipped across the ocean to New York, where it was reassembled on a pedestal on Bedloe’s Island in New York Harbor. On October 28, 1886, despite cold, rainy weather, hundreds of thousands of people turned out for the statue’s dedication.

Lady Liberty’s face was veiled with a French flag while the assembled crowd was subjected to a number of speeches by various dignitaries. Bartholdi himself was hidden inside the statue’s crown, ready to drop the flag and unveil the statue as soon as the speeches were over; but he let the flag fall prematurely, prompting enthusiastic cheers from the crowd and bringing a sudden close to the speech then in progress.


Sweet land of liberty

July 4, 2014

Arthur S. Mole was a British-born commercial photographer who worked in Zion, Illinois. During and after World War I, Mole and his partner John D. Thomas traveled from one military camp to another, posing thousands of soldiers to form gigantic patriotic symbols that they then photographed from above. Mole and Thomas would spend a week or longer preparing for these massive works, which they photographed from a high tower using an 11 x 14 inch view camera.

Mole and Thomas’s Human Statue of Liberty, involving 18,000 uniformed service men, was formed and photographed on the parade grounds at Camp Dodge, Iowa, in July of 1918.

Their Human Liberty Bell was made up of more than 25,000 service men at Camp Dix in New Jersey.

The Human American Eagle was photographed at Camp Gordon in Atlanta, Georgia, and involved 12,500 service men and women.


Happy anniversary, Statue of Liberty

October 28, 2013

“Liberty Enlightening the World” was unveiled to the public one hundred and twenty-seven years ago today. The statue was designed by the French artist and sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, with engineering help from Eugene Viollet-le-Duc and Alexandre Gustave Eiffel. It was constructed in France, then dismantled and packed into more than two hundred shipping crates, then shipped across the ocean to New York, where it was reassembled on a pedestal on Bedloe’s Island in New York Harbor. On October 28, 1886, despite cold, rainy weather, hundreds of thousands of people turned out for the statue’s dedication.

Lady Liberty’s face was veiled with a French flag while the assembled crowd was subjected to a number of speeches by various dignitaries. Bartholdi himself was hidden inside the statue’s crown, ready to drop the flag and unveil the statue as soon as the speeches were over; but he let the flag fall prematurely, prompting enthusiastic cheers from the crowd and bringing a sudden close to the speech then in progress.


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